Azerbaijan journal of Educational studies

ISSN: 0134-3289
E-ISSN: 2617-8060
» » Writing and information literacy: Major steps to impede the use of unreliable sources for academic purposes

Writing and information literacy: Major steps to impede the use of unreliable sources for academic purposes

03 July 2020, Friday
108
Volume 690, Issue 1, 2020  
Tamilla Mammadova - Assistant Professor, PhD, Writing and Information Literacy Program, ADA University. Baku, Azerbaijan.
E-mail: tomammadova@ada.edu.az; ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0901-5853

Received: Nov. 14, 2019;       Accepted: Feb. 17, 2020 

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.29228/edu.100Full-Text PDF 
Abstract 
Recently, “online systems have created new reference sources and have increased the search capabilities of sources already available in printed form” (Piternick, 1990, p.534). On the one hand, it definitely facilitated students’ quick access to the materials needed. On the other hand, the present-day online platforms do not only provide learners with some well-grounded sources but also tempt them with a plethora of unreliable data leading students to cheating and even plagiarism. Thus, the goal of this paper is to investigate the most common reasons that make students use unreliable sources and to suggest some measures that will motivate learners to work with trustworthy and reliable materials. For this, two studies were carried out. First of all, to detect the nature of the most popular unreliable sources used by the students, a number of Writing and Information Literacy program students’ essays were analysed by Turnitin (internet-based plagiarism detection) program. Secondly, a total number of 124 students participated in an online survey consisting of 22 items that sought to understand the most common reasons why learners give their preferences to these unreliable sources. The data obtained in the first study shows that the most popular unreliable sources are not only Wikipedia and personal websites but opinionated articles such as editorials and self-published sources. As regards the second study, a number of reasons such as poor understanding of the differences between reliable and unreliable sources; inability to use library web-page appropriately; poor understanding of citation techniques, etc. make students use easily available data. The study terminates with some important suggestions to prevent plagiarism and cheating.

Keywords: Blogs, plagiarism, essays, forums, online database, reliable sources.

To cite this article: Mammadova T. (2020) Writing and information literacy: Major steps to impede the use of unreliable sources for academic purposes. Azerbaijan Journal of Educational Studies. Vol. 690, Issue I, pp. 163-176

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